Tesla’s response to complaints in China has shed light on the company’s, and CEO Elon Musk’s, treatment of regulators and how the importance of China’s market may change their tune. (Bloomberg Opinion)

Author Vasuki Shastry explains some of the challenges facing the growth of Asian businesses that he feels are underreported by what he describes as the “Asian Thought-Leadership Mafia.” Examples include the decline in birth rate, rising senior populations, and a disconnect between citizens and governing bodies. (Bloomberg Opinion)

Dubai, and other cities with few pandemic restrictions, have been favored by some business executives who still value doing business in person. This has opened up discussions about the risks of doing effective business in a world still rocked by Covid-19. (WSJ)

As pressures rise for Japan’s CEOs to get vaccinated, with no major plans in place by the government to vaccinate the public, business leaders are debating whether or not to get vaccinated overseas if it means keeping their companies alive (FT). Separately, Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga’s announcement of higher emission reduction goals caused panic among Japan’s bureaucracy, as the new target came without much planning or discussion. (FT)

Tesla Is on Thin Ice With Chinese Regulators; Elon Musk is used to treating the authorities with contempt. That won’t fly in China.
Anjani Trivedi – Bloomberg
Elon Musk has done a better job at selling and making cars in China in just two years than he has in the U.S. over the past decade. As a foreign business, he’s also had a smooth ride with the authorities — until recently.
jlne.ws/3eaDiCH

What the Asian Thought-Leadership Mafia Gets Wrong; A Q&A with author Vasuki Shastry on the real challenges facing Asia once you get past the usual bromides.
Daniel Moss – Bloomberg
Asia is the future of the world economy! The growth is so impressive, the opportunities so marvelous! If I had five Indonesian rupiah for every time an executive or investor has asserted these sentiments, I could retire in comfort tomorrow.
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Welcome to the New Casablancas: The World Cities That Stayed Open; International executives are making their way to Dubai and other locales where business is being conducted in person
Yaroslav Trofimov – WSJ
Oliver J. Christof used to spend some 300 days a year traveling the world, drumming up business for his family’s industrial-services company in Austria. In October, when Europe entered a new wave of lockdowns, the family relocated to Dubai, one of the few cities open in a world largely closed.
jlne.ws/2PHK7Ca

The vaccination dilemma facing Japan’s CEOs; Does the need to patrol overseas business empires outweigh that of enduring alongside their staff?
Leo Lewis – FT
This time a year ago, Yuji Kuroiwa, the governor of Japan’s Kanagawa prefecture, attempted some light wordplay in the face of a terrifying new disease, economic spasm and life-changing strictures.
on.ft.com/3udCu5u

Japan’s ambitious carbon target sparks bureaucratic panic; Goal to cut emissions 46% by 2030 unrealistic and made with little planning, experts say
Robin Harding – FT
When Yoshihide Suga pledged to slash Japan’s carbon emissions by 2030, the prime minister received a warm welcome from world leaders at Joe Biden’s climate summit. But his announcement sparked panic across Japan’s bureaucracy.
on.ft.com/33dj0SN

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