Tallarium CEO Ermilov’s plans to banish Excel from the OTC energy markets

John Lothian

John Lothian

Executive Chairman and CEO

Stanislav Ermilov, founder and CEO of Tallarium, believes the over-the-counter energy markets are broken and the cause is the common Excel spreadsheet that has been the front end for deal making. John Lothian News talked with Ermilov at FIA Expo 2022 about how his company, Tallarium, fixes that problem.  

In his message to attendees at the FIA’s Innovators Pavilion in November, Ermilov said the off exchange energy markets are crucial but lag behind where they should be technologically. His company, Tallarium, fixes that and is also a tool to bring fairness, transparency and price discovery to these markets, he said.

Ermilov started his company out of frustration from his experience as an energy market maker where traders get quotes from brokers via calls, chats and Excel. He invented Tallarium to use AI to capture unstructured data in real time and then process, convert and structure it. The company currently covers more than 270 different product benchmarks and has also seen the demand for real time forward curves. Ermilov says he expects Tallarium will become the industry standard for price discovery for over-the-counter energy markets.

We asked Ermilov who Tellarium’s customers are and he said its focus is the top 40 most active players in their respective markets and that the firm has also seen demand from banks.

When asked if he thought Tallarium would be innovator of the year, he said that was up to the judges. He added that in today’s environment with lots of volatility and uncertainty, and legacy processes that need to change, his company is what the FIA innovator awards are about.

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