THE JOHN LOTHIAN NEWS DAILY UPDATE (WEEKLY ROUNDUP) – WEEK OF 1/16/2023

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Observations & Insight Volatility Insight of the Week: CME Group's volatility index indicates Soybean Oil Skew Ratio is reaching a 3-month high. To learn more about CME Group's Volatility Index, please visit here ++++ Lead Stories Filling gaps in market data with...

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Euronext CEO Boujnah Discusses AI, Brexit, and ESG at FIA Conference

Euronext CEO Boujnah Discusses AI, Brexit, and ESG at FIA Conference

Stephane Boujnah says you cannot afford to be late to AI, but also that exchange matching engine operators need to be precise, not roughly correct. The Euronext CEO spoke to John Lothian News at the FIA International Futures Industry Conference in Boca Raton, FL, as part of the JLN Industry Leader video series sponsored by Wedbush.  Boujnah pulled no punches in addressing the impact of AI, Brexit, geopolitical risks, cybersecurity threats and staying competitive. 

Industry Analyst Larry Tabb Discusses Cryptocurrencies, AI, and Market Dynamics at FIA Futures Conference

Industry Analyst Larry Tabb Discusses Cryptocurrencies, AI, and Market Dynamics at FIA Futures Conference

At the FIA International Futures Industry Conference in Boca Raton, FL, John Lothian News conducted an  interview with Larry Tabb of Bloomberg Intelligence as part of the JLN Industry Leader video series sponsored by Wedbush. Tabb, known for his expertise in industry and market analysis, shared  his insights into cryptocurrencies, artificial intelligence, equity options growth and increased demand for U.S. equities during non-traditional market hours. 

John Lothian: Week in Review (April 1-5, 2024)

John Lothian: Week in Review (April 1-5, 2024)

JLN PRESS ROOM PICK OF THE WEEK

GE’s Final Split, a Breakup 130 Years in the Making

At its height, General Electric was one of the biggest companies in the U.S., touching nearly every part of life with its lightbulbs, movies, refrigerators, plane engines, and MRI machines, among other things.

After two decades of turmoil, GE is much smaller. It sold off many of those businesses, shedding jobs and debt. On April 2, it will finish its breakup by splitting apart its power and aerospace divisions.

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